BY: World Cannabis - March 9, 2017 Marc and Jodie Emery were arrested last night in at the Toronto Pearson Airport on their way to ...
By CTV News | February 18, 2017 There Might be Something Special About Grandma’s Latest Batch of Brownies A new monthly workshop north of Toronto ...
By Shane Ross | February 18th, 2017 Protesters show support for raided dispensaries About 20 people rallied outside Saint John City Hall on Saturday to protest ...
Manitoba wants to set limit on marijuana consumption in public places BY: The Canadian Press - March 20, 2017 - CBC News The Manitoba government ...
By Dean Beeby - CBC News - Mar 15, 2017 Lack of hard science on marijuana impairment and testing raises concerns among employers over safety More ...
By World Cannabis News - March 8, 2017 Vancouver 420 -  World's Largest and Most Socially Acceptable 420 Event comes to Vancouver April 20, 2017. ...

Latest stories

0

Former Mountie teaching safe workplace marijuana use

Former Mountie teaching safe workplace marijuana use

By: CBC NEWS – March 20, 2017

Ed Secondiak thinks workplaces need to educate their employees on safety with regards to cannabis in light of increased use and pending legalization.

The former RCMP officer said the goal isn’t to punish people, but to be proactive to avoid unintended consequences of marijuana use, like workplace accidents.

“We’re not concerned about whether it’s illegal or legal. Our concerns more so are the impact on the workplace, in particular with safety,” said Secondiak, who is president of the occupational health company ECS Safety Services.

Medicinal marijuana use is on the rise and the federal government has promised legalization legislation.

Rules similar to alcohol, except …

In light of that, Secondiak said there can be confusion about who can smoke marijuana before work.

He said the rules around recreational pot use are no different than regulations on alcohol. The substances are different, but intoxication at work remains the same.

However, he noted, people are prescribed pot and may need to use it at work.

‘We’re trying to make sure people go back home with all the parts they came to work with.’– Ed Secondiak, ECS Safety Services

The level of impairment varies from person to person based on factors such as the amount consumed, the method of consumption and their level of tolerance.

“In many cases you actually have to go through a trial and error to see how it’s affecting that employee,” said Secondiak

Employers should be open to discussing marijuana at work so they can collaborate with employees to find the best solution for everyone, he said.

Extra care with ‘safety sensitive positions’

Secondiak said it’s important that people don’t work in “safety sensitive positions” if they’re using recreationally or medicinally. A safety sensitive position is one where accidents, injuries or fatalities can happen, such as a machinery operator or a medical professional.

“We’re trying to make sure people go back home with all the parts they came to work with.”

Mettrum recalled its products after 'small amounts of Myclobutanil' were found.

Ed Secondiak has given several presentations on drug use in the workplace across Canada and says he’s witnessed a decline in workplace accidents in the aftermath. (Robert Short/CBC)

Employers may need to accommodate medicinal marijuana users who do work in safety sensitive positions by finding them a different role or examining types of leave, he said.

To read the entire article click here



HTML tutorial

Share This:

0

Manitoba wants to set limit on marijuana consumption in public places

Manitoba wants to set limit on marijuana consumption in public places

BY: The Canadian Press – March 20, 2017 – CBC News

The Manitoba government is moving to set restrictions on marijuana similar to those on alcohol.

Proposed legislation would list marijuana as an intoxicant and ban people from consuming it in a vehicle.

Police would also have the right to suspend a driver’s licence for 24 hours — similar to an alcohol provision — if they thought a person was under the influence of pot.

Medical marijuana user and legalization advocate, Steven Stairs said he is disappointed by the proposed legislation.

He called it overly broad and said it fails to distinguish medical marijuana use from recreational consumption.

“If I’m a medical user and I have pot in my car, do I have to put it in my trunk too? That is kind of stupid,” he said.

“So the police can pull you over and say ‘you look stoned we’re going to arrest you,’ well what if I was really tired or what I have some allergies?” Stairs said.

“Unless you can prove how impaired I am with a tool or a test, I don’t think it’s fair.”

Under the new bill, marijuana, like tobacco, could not be smoked in enclosed public places.

Stairs also wants to know how the proposed legislation would impact people who use marijuana for medical reasons.

Justice Minister Heather Stefanson says the province is laying the groundwork for when the federal government legalizes cannabis.

“This is by no means the end of this this, this is just the beginning,” Stefanson said, adding more bills could be coming on marijuana restrictions and how it impacts drivers.

“We’re actually the only province across Canada that’s bringing forward this kind of legislation now to help deal with some of the safety and health issues, so we’re out in front of this,” Stefanson said.

If someone has “a trace of marijuana” in their system and is not impaired, they should not have their licence taken away, said Swan.

The Manitoba bill says public schools would be required to ban marijuana under their codes of conduct, even after it becomes legal.

To read the entire article click here



HTML tutorial

Share This:

0

Study: People Prefer Medical Cannabis to Other Medications

Study: People Prefer Medical Cannabis to Other Medications

BY: Zawn Villines – March 20, 2017 – GoodTherapy

People taking psychoactive medications and drugs for conditions such as chronic pain tend to prefer medical cannabis to other drugs, including sedatives, opioids, and antidepressants, a study published in the International Journal of Drug Policy has found.

Many analysts have expressed concerns about the use of opioids to treat chronic pain. More than 183,000 people died of prescription opioid overdoses between 1999 and 2015 in the United States. Some research, such as a recent study that looked at states with medical cannabis laws, suggests access to medical marijuana could reduce opioid abuse.

Medical Cannabis: Alternative to Opioids and Other Drugs?

The study used survey data from 271 people registered to purchase medical cannabis. Participants answered 107 questions covering demographic data, use of cannabis, reliance on other drugs, and health history.

Survey respondents had been prescribed drugs for a range of reasons, including chronic pain, mental health conditions, and gastrointestinal issues. Overall, 63% reported using cannabis instead of prescription drugs. The most common drug class for which participants substituted cannabis was opioids, accounting for 30% of the total. Sixteen percent of participants used cannabis to replace benzodiazepines, and 12% used cannabis instead of antidepressants.

Cannabis was also a popular replacement for potentially addictive nonmedical drugs. Twenty-five percent of respondents used cannabis instead of drinking alcohol, 12% used it instead of cigarettes or tobacco, and 3% replaced illicit drugs with marijuana.

The study’s authors suggest side effects, concerns about addiction, and level of safety figure prominently among the decision to use cannabis instead of other drugs. Some medical cannabis users report cannabis works better than more traditional prescription drugs.

Barriers to Medical Marijuana Continue

The study found participants often faced barriers to accessing medical marijuana. More than half (55%) were charged for their cannabis prescription, with 25% paying more than $300 for the prescription. Some participants still purchased cannabis from unregulated sources despite having a prescription.

To read the entire article click here



HTML tutorial

Share This:

0

Jodie Emery returns home to Vancouver to begin cutting ties with Cannabis Culture empire

Jodie Emery returns home to Vancouver to begin cutting ties with Cannabis Culture empire

BY: Dan Fumano – March 20, 2017 – The Vancouver Sun

 

Jodie Emery returned to her Chinatown apartment for the first time since being released from custody earlier this month in Toronto, where she, her husband Marc Emery, and three other associates in the Cannabis Culture business were arrested and charged with a range of offenses including drug trafficking.

After two nights in custody, the Emerys were released on bail subject to conditions including a prohibition on “any business dealings with Cannabis Culture locations”. Emery has until Friday, she said, to remove herself from Cannabis Culture, a brand her husband started in the 1990s and she has helped develop since 2004.

“To be stripped of everything I have and everything I’ve done is degrading and upsetting,” she said, adding the end of her recent foray into running a franchise business means she can return to being “a broke activist” once again.

“I will fight this, I will not stop being an activist. You know, I was too busy with work to be an activist, and now, well, take away the business, and you’ve made a monster out of me,” she said with a laugh.

“There are many other people supplying cannabis in much larger amounts. But for us, everybody knows, it’s a very political persecution,” she said. “I’m more fired up than ever.”

Emery will spend this week removing her name from bank accounts, ending her directorship of the company, and planning for the handover of Cannabis Culture’s day-to-day operation to longtime employees, she said. She has been a director of Cannabis Culture since Marc removed himself from the company in advance of his 2010 extradition to the U.S. to serve a four-year jail sentence in connection with his mail-order cannabis seed business.

Cannabis Culture’s expansion into retail pot sales began with the opening last April of a Vancouver store, followed a month later by a Toronto location. The dates of the Emery’s alleged trafficking offences began the day the Toronto dispensary opened, last May 27, court documents show. In the last 11 months, more than a dozen Cannabis Culture dispensary franchises opened in B.C., Ontario, and Quebec.

Storefront marijuana sales remain illegal, despite the proliferation of dispensaries across Canada over the last two years, and some municipalities, led by Vancouver, moving to license them. Marijuana use is illegal under federal law in Canada, except for Health Canada-registered patients ordering by mail from the country’s 40 licensed producers.

And now, for the first time ever, the Emerys expect to soon be authorized medical marijuana patients.

Another condition of their release is not to consume unlawful substances, including cannabis, except “with a valid prescription.” Emery said she had a doctor’s visit last week, via Skype, to obtain a prescription for medical marijuana for anxiety. She hopes to have her medical card this week, and to place an order next week. In the meantime, she has tried to keep relaxed with an occasional glass of red wine.

While the Emerys await their next court appearance in Toronto — scheduled for April 21, coincidentally a day after the international 4/20 cannabis celebrations — neither is allowed to leave Canada. Marc must remain in Ontario, and Jodie is allowed to leave Ontario only for scheduled, police-approved visits to B.C.

To read the entire article click here



HTML tutorial

Share This:

0

Medical Cannabis in The Philippines

By Votleface -March 20, 2017

Over the past year, much has been written about the horrific consequences of the Philippines’ war on drugs, led by its frankly psychopathic president, Rodrigo Duterte.

Thousands have died, gunned down in the streets by police and masked vigilantes, simply for having anything to do with illegal drugs. The reign of terror that has engulfed the country has turned the backstreets and slums of Manila into a war zone, leaving everybody wondering just how it will all end.

A few months ago, it produced a paradox – it emerged that the instigator of all of this death and destruction was himself – allegedly – a drug abuser. Duterte, it was claimed, was hooked on Fentanyl. Now, just as the violence is being ramped up once again, another paradox has emerged. Earlier this month, just one day after the Filipino parliament approved a third and final reading of a Bill which will reinstate the death penalty for drug-related offences, the House Committee on Health endorsed another Bill which, if passed into law, will legalise and regulate the use of medical cannabis.

Read the entire article here



HTML tutorial

Share This:

0

San Francisco’s trendiest coffee roaster is now making a $12 marijuana-infused cold brew

San Francisco’s trendiest coffee roaster is now making a $12 marijuana-infused cold brew

BY: Melia Robinson – Business Insider – March 16, 2017

A Bay Area pot startup has made it even easier to “wake and bake,” with a new marijuana-infused cold-brew coffee.

Somatik, an artisanal pot-products company founded in 2016, teamed up with boutique roaster Ritual Coffee to create the drink, which hit cannabis dispensary refrigerators in January. An eight-ounce bottle retails for $12.

“Cannabis is a lot like coffee in that … everyone has their routine. I wanted to show that you could actually build a routine around cannabis that [keeps you] functional and does help you,” says Christopher Schroeder, founder of Somatik.

Somatik Featuring Ritual Coffee uses coffee beans grown in western Colombia — steeped for 12 hours in cold water to produce a robust, silky concentrate — and 15 milligrams of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the ingredient in marijuana that gets users high. Drinking the whole bottle would be the (very) rough equivalent of taking a few hits off a joint.

The Bay Area has long been a breeding ground for innovative coffee roasters, from venture-capital darling Blue Bottle Coffee to family-run Philz Coffee. More recently, another industry the area is famous for — marijuana — has moved towards artisanal products as the market matures. Entrepreneurs like Schroeder are optimistic that craft weed will become the new specialty coffee — a lucrative business.

Somatik Featuring Ritual Coffee pairs the two trends in a product that aims to be high-quality and discreet. Schroeder, a former product manager at wearables company Jawbone, wanted to create something his family and friends would find approachable.

“You could have it at your desk and no one’s going to be like, ‘Oh, what are you doing?’ But also, you could talk about it and it does help normalize it. You’re not smoking a joint or ripping a dab. You’re just drinking something that tastes really good,” Schroeder says.

To read the entire article click here



HTML tutorial

Share This:

0

Jeff Sessions Says Marijuana Is Only ‘Slightly Less Awful’ Than Heroin. Science Says He’s Wrong

Alexandra Sifferlin -Time – Mar 16, 2017

Attorney General Jeff Sessions said in remarks prepared for delivery this week that he believes marijuana is “only slightly less awful,” than heroin.

“I realize this may be an unfashionable belief in a time of growing tolerance of drug use. But too many lives are at stake to worry about being fashionable,” reads his prepared statement Wednesday during an appearance with local and federal law enforcement officials in Richmond, Va. “I reject the idea that America will be a better place if marijuana is sold in every corner store. And I am astonished to hear people suggest that we can solve our heroin crisis by legalizing marijuana — so people can trade one life-wrecking dependency for another that’s only slightly less awful. Our nation needs to say clearly once again that using drugs will destroy your life.”

Sessions veered from the script and did not say marijuana is “only slightly less awful” during his speech, though it remains in the remarks on the Department of Justice website. Scientists who study marijuana disagree with his position.

Read the entire article here



HTML tutorial

Share This:

0

More than 200 cannabis plants seized on NSW mid-north coast, police


The Sydney Morning Herald –  March 18, 2017

Police have seized more than 200 cannabis plants and 20kg of cannabis leaf in 48 hours after two unrelated raids on the NSW mid north coast.

The drugs have a potential estimated street value of half a million dollars, police said.

During the first search at an Argents Hills property west of Bowraville on Thursday, officers allegedly discovered 145 cannabis plants, and about 7kg of cannabis leaf and cash.

A 47-year-old man was charged with cultivating, possessing and supplying an indictable quantity of cannabis and dealing with property suspected of being the proceeds of crime. A second man, 68, was also charged with cultivation and supply.

Read the entire article here



HTML tutorial

Share This:

0

Experts: Cannabis Could Help Cure Alzheimer’s If Lawmakers Would Chill Out

According to brain experts, cannabis has shown considerable promise for treating the cause of dementia and Alzheimer’s, but federal regulators keep blocking their path toward a cure.

Despite evidence suggesting that chemicals found in cannabis can helpfully clear the brain of buildup that leads to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, ongoing federal opposition to the drug makes the road to finding a cure a long and difficult one, according to researchers. As the Independent reports, scientists at California’s renowned Salk Institute are expressing concern over the fairly unfounded legal hurdles that keep slowing down their work toward an effective treatment for these fatal diseases, which afflict millions of Americans each year.

Last year, the team published study results indicating that the active chemicals or cannabinoids found in cannabis, such as euphoria-inducing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), can effectively relieve the amyloid protein buildup and cell damage related to dementia using some of the brain’s own protective measures. Unlike methods which seek to remove amyloid buildup from the outside of brain cells, CNBC explained, those explored by Salk researchers work with the brain’s natural endocannabanoids, which prevent cell death, to fight buildup inside cells and resulting inflammation at an earlier stage in the disease.

 

Read the entire article here



HTML tutorial

Share This:

0

Manitoba Bill Will Help Police Crack Down On Marijuana-Impaired Drivers

Manitoba Bill Will Help Police Crack Down On Marijuana-Impaired Drivers

By: The Canadian Press – The Huffington Post – March 15, 2017

WINNIPEG — The Manitoba government is set to introduce legislation to help police crack down on drivers who are high on marijuana.

Justice Minister Heather Stefanson says the bill, expected Thursday, will also include measures dealing with health and safety concerns stemming from the expected federal legalization of pot.

Stefanson hasn’t provide details in advance of the bill’s presentation, but says the aim is to have checks and balances for when marijuana becomes legal.

She says technology that would let police officers test drivers for pot impairment is still being developed, and the bill will propose different tools for law enforcement.

One in 10 drivers tested had drugs in their system

Stefanson says she’s concerned by a survey from Manitoba Public Insurance that said one in 10 drivers who took part in a voluntary test had drugs in their system.

More than half of those with drugs in their system tested positive for marijuana, while cocaine came in second.

“We’re taking a proactive approach here to ensure that when that (federal) legislation does come forward, that we already have some checks and balances in place to ensure the safety and health of all Manitobans,” Stefanson said Wednesday.

Other details concerning legalized pot in Manitoba, such as where it would be sold, have yet to be worked out, she added.

“We have to wait for the federal legislation to come out.”

The Manitoba Public Insurance test involved breath and saliva samples collected last fall from 1,230 drivers. MPI said 124 tested positive for some form of drug. More than one in five of those had more than one drug in their system.

The data did not indicate whether the drivers had enough in their system to be impaired.

Only 2.4 per cent of the drivers had alcohol in their system, MPI said.

To read the entire article click here



HTML tutorial

Share This:

Sample Code

Share This: